Gastroenterology

A new study presented at the Digestive Diseases Week (3–6 May 2014, Chicago, USA) has shown that the intravenous iron therapy, ferric carboxymaltose, improves symptoms of iron deficiency anaemia, and has an improved safety profile compared with other intravenous iron treatments currently available.

Iron deficiency anaemia is associated with colorectal cancer1. Several studies have highlighted the important relationship between preoperative anaemia and poor postoperative outcomes for these patients1,2. One cause of this relationship may be increased perioperative allogeneic red blood cell transfusion (ARBT), as a result of preoperative anaemia. The use of ARBT has been independently linked with impaired surgical and oncological outcome3.

A new article has indicated that both iron deficiency and anaemia are prevalent in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, with a higher prevalence in the former. The authors also demonstrate that more than half of anaemic patients with inflammatory bowel disease have iron deficiency.

A new article has indicated that both iron deficiency and anaemia are prevalent in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, with a higher prevalence in the former. The authors also demonstrate that more than half of anaemic patients with inflammatory bowel disease have iron deficiency.

This year’s European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation congress (ECCO) took place on the 20–22 February 2014 in Copenhagen, Denmark. The congress saw record attendance with a total of 5175 delegates from 78 countries. Sessions relating to iron deficiency in gastroenterology included details on emerging iron therapies for inflammatory bowel disease, biomarkers of iron absorption and iron deficiency, updates to ECCO guidelines and recent prevalence data for iron deficiency. Presented below are some of the highlights.

Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) is the most widely used procedure for the surgical treatment of obesity in the USA.  Reduced iron absorption is an expected consequence of this surgical intervention due to exclusion of the duodenum and proximal jejunum resulting in reduced iron absorption, diminished exposure of food to gastric acidity and reduced dietary intake1.

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