Haematology

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The optimal timing of intravenous iron therapy, in relationship to the type of erythropoiesis stimulating agent (ESA) used and the timing of ESA administration, has not been systematically studied. Since long-acting ESAs became available, it has not been established if there is an optimal window for intravenous iron use following ESA administration.

Study results have revealed that treatment with intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is associated with a more frequent correction of post-operative anaemia than oral treatment with ferrous glycine sulphate.

Post-operative anaemia is common in patients undergoing major orthopaedic surgery such as total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The prolonged low haemoglobin levels following major surgery has been associated with increased mortality and morbidity.

Iron sucrose is a frequently used intravenous iron compound for the treatment of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in a broad range of therapeutic areas, including in patients with conditions such as chronic kidney disease, inflammatory bowel disease, pregnancy (second and third trimester), postpartum period, heavy menstrual bleeding and cancer.

The 'Frequently Asked Questions' section of this website offers information on definitions and causes of iron deficiency, and treatment for patients with the condition. To view this educational page, please click here.

Patients scheduled for major elective orthopaedic procedures frequently present with preoperative iron deficiency and anaemia1,2. Iron deficiency anaemia is the most common form of anaemia and preoperative anaemia has been linked to higher postoperative infection rate, poorer physical functioning and recovery, decreased quality of life, and increased length of hospital stay (LOS) and mortality1–5.

Study results have revealed that treatment with i.v. ferric carboxymaltose is associated with a more frequent correction of post-operative anaemia than oral treatment with ferrous glycine sulphate.

Post-operative anaemia is common in patients undergoing major orthopaedic surgery such as total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The prolonged low Hb levels following major surgery has been associated with increased mortality and morbidity.

The prevalence of iron deficiency in female, but not male, blood donors increases with donation frequency and decreases with age, new data indicate. The authors suggest that these results should inform blood organisations seeking to alleviate the burden of iron deficiency.

Iron deficiency is an important consequence of blood donation. This cross sectional study of Australian blood donors investigated the problem in the blood donor population to enable identification of potential solutions to donor iron deficiency.

Professor Michael Auerbach is a haematologist and oncologist at Auerbach Hematology and Oncology Associates, Inc. (Baltimore, USA) and a Clinical Professor of Medicine at Georgetown University School of Medicine (Washington DC). He is also a member of the Lombardi Cancer Center (Washington DC). He serves on the scientific board of the Network for Advancement of Transfusion Alternatives, and advises the Society for the Advancement of Blood Management.

Study results have revealed that ferumoxytol may be a suitable treatment alternative to iron sucrose for patients with iron deficiency anaemia when oral iron is unsatisfactory or intolerable. The authors also suggest that ferumoxytol has the potential to increase treatment compliance in this patient population.

Patients scheduled for major elective orthopaedic procedures frequently present with preoperative iron deficiency and anaemia1,2. Iron deficiency anaemia is the most common form of anaemia and preoperative anaemia has been linked to higher postoperative infection rate, poorer physical functioning and recovery, decreased quality of life, and increased length of hospital stay (LOS) and mortality1–5.

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